North-East man to cross America on two wheels


A North-East man is to cross America on two wheels to aid the region’s air ambulance. Jason Woodhouse, from Newcastle, will take part in the Trans Am Bike Race – a nonstop, self supported road bike race along the 4,233 mile Trans America Trail from Oregon to Virginia. The race will kick off on June 7th and Mr Woodhouse hopes to raise thousands of pounds in his epic feat while supporting five charities.

A North-East man is to cross America on two wheels to aid the region’s air ambulance.

Jason Woodhouse, from Newcastle, will take part in the Trans Am Bike Race – a nonstop, self supported road bike race along the 4,233 mile Trans America Trail from Oregon to Virginia.

The race will kick off on June 7th and Mr Woodhouse hopes to raise thousands of pounds in his epic feat while supporting five charities. The Great North Air Ambulance Service, Water Aid, Sea Shepherd UK, British Divers Marine Life Rescue and Refuge are all set to benefit.

During the course of the Trans Am Bike Race, he will ascend over 150,000 ft – the equivalent of climbing Mount Everest five times.

The 27-year-old said: ​“I’m going head-to-head with two world record holders, racing a route that is recommended to take around five months in only 20 or so days.

“This race comes without the frills of other big events. There is no support team, no end of day back massages and I carry what I can on my bike.

“The Trans Am Bike Race is almost twice the distance of the Tour De France, and we must bear the weight of our sleeping equipment and food without a support vehicle.

“I have one set of clothes for one month and three pairs of socks. It’s called bikepacking.”

Mr Woodhouse suffered a head injury while training for the race a week ago when he swerved to miss a rabbit and hit a metal post.

He said: “The fall split my helmet. If I hadn’t have been wearing it, I would have cracked open my head. I was very lucky.”  

Mr Woodhouse will burn around 11,000 calories per day, the equivalent of 42 Mars Bars.

He will pass through 10 states and hopes to finish the race in Yorktown on Independence Day, “just in time to crack open a beer,” he said.  

“Taking on one of the world’s toughest cycling races is no small task but I promise to give this challenge everything my legs have got in them.”

Speaking about the air ambulance service, Mr Woodhouse said: “The Great North Air Ambulance Service is a fantastic charity which carries out incredible work. It is a big relief when you see them swooping over the city to rescue someone.”

There will be around 60 people taking part in the race with live satellite tracking of all the bikers so people can keep up to date with the participants’ progress.  

To track progress, read news and sponsor the charities visit: http://www.boyonhisbike.com/

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