Electric shock victim meets medic who saved his life


A man who survived a 20,000 volt electric shock has met the medic who saved his life. John Dodsworth, from Whickham, was working on a farm near Barnard Castle when the piece of equipment he was using touched an overhead power line. The 39-year-old sustained severe burns to his neck, head, back, and legs and the Great North Air Ambulance Service (GNAAS) was called to the scene.

A man who survived a 20,000 volt electric shock has met the medic who saved his life.

John Dodsworth, from Whickham, was working on a farm near Barnard Castle when the piece of equipment he was using touched an overhead power line.

The 39-year-old sustained severe burns to his neck, head, back, and legs and the Great North Air Ambulance Service (GNAAS) was called to the scene. With specialist medics on board, they treated Mr Dodsworth before flying him to James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough.

The lorry driver was placed on a life-support machine and spent three weeks in a coma. He then underwent skin grafts and had a metal titanium plate fitted into his head.

While still in hospital, he and partner Michelle decided they would tie the knot after his close brush with death.

Now married, Mrs Dodsworth said:  “If it had not been for the air ambulance he definitely would not be here today. I can’t put into words what they mean to me. They are amazing.

“The air ambulance also helped my brother after a motorbike accident, so there are two people in our family who they have really helped.”

The couple, along with two of their children, came to the charity’s base at Durham Tees Valley Airport, near Darlington, to meet Colin Clark, the paramedic on board the aircraft who saved Mr Dodsworth. 

“I just wanted to shake Colin’s hand,” said Mr Dodsworth. “I’m so glad I have had the chance to do that.”

His stepdaughter, Courtney Wright, 18, ran this year’s Great North Run in aid of the charity and raised around £500 for the service. 

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